Archive for the ‘Patentable Subject Matter’ Category

Enzo Biochem V. Applera Corp. – When “Words Can Hurt You”

Thursday, March 19th, 2015

iStock_000010676885_SmallOn March 16, 2015 (Appeal no. 2014-1321), the Fed. Cir. reversed the district court’s construction of a claim term relating to the scope of “A,” a moiety capable of direct or indirect signaling that is attached by a linker to a nucleotide base. (A copy of the decision can be found at the end of this post.) The claim read: “wherein A comprises at least one component of a signaling moiety capable of producing a detectable signal [wherein the linker does not interfere] with formation of the signaling moiety or detection of the detectable signal….”

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Pacing Technologies v. Garmin – D&D Explained

Friday, February 20th, 2015

disclaimer marked on rubber stampIn this decision—No. 2014-1396 (Fed. Cir., Feb. 18, 2015)—the court affirmed a grant of summary judgment (a copy can be found at the end of this post) that Garmin’s exercise products do not infringe the claims of Pacing’s US Pat. No. 8,101,843. The court reviewed the case de novo because the district court had relied entirely on the intrinsic evidence. The claims were directing to a systems comprising  “playback devices” that the judge ruled do not play target tempo or pace information as “audio, video or visible signals,” e.g., while the user is running.

The panel affirmed that the preamble should be given weight as a claim limitation because:

“[w]hen limitations in the body of the claim rely upon and derive antecedent basis from the preamble, then the preamble may act as a necessary component of the claimed invention.” Eaton Corp. v. Rockwell International Corp., 323 F.3d 1332 (Fed. Cir. 2003).

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“Precision Medicine” Initiative Leaves Patents “Lost in Space”

Wednesday, February 18th, 2015

iStock_000009217209_SmallOn January 30th, the White House released a press release expanding upon President Obama’s mention of “precision medicine” in his State of the Union Address. Not surprisingly, the details are pretty much what we who are involved in various aspects of “personalized medicine” would expect – an emphasis on the use of genomic diagnostics to improve treatment selection – especially for cancer patients. The largest of the “Key Investments” listed would be to the NIH to develop what looks like the creation of a reference data base “through engaged participants and open, responsible data sharing.” The NCI would get $70 million to “identify genomic drivers in cancer” and develop more effective approaches to treatment.

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Myriad Settles – Questions Remain

Tuesday, January 27th, 2015

Yesterday, Myriad announced it has settled the BRCA assay litigations that had been ongoing—and not going well– with Pathway Genomics, Invitae and Gene by Gene (and I assume….Ambry and Labcorp). Although I was just about at the brink of shouting “Stop The Madness” – the settlements mean that the IP community will not learn if Myriad had any patent-eligible claims in any of their assay patents. Would claims directed to mutations at specific positions of the BRCA1 or 2 genes have passed muster as that elusive “inventive concept” that both the Fed. Cir. and the S. Ct. extracted from Mayo as the standard by which to judge assays reciting abstract ideas or natural phenomena (which one is it?)?

You can read an article about the settlement on the GenomeWeb page by clicking here.