Posts Tagged ‘FDA’

FDA Accepts First Biosimilar Application for Review

Monday, July 28th, 2014

In an important step forward for the introduction of “generic biological,” the FDA announced that it has accepted Sandoz’s application to market a generic version of Amgen’s Neupogen®, which stimulates white blood cell production. As you may recall, about two years ago, the FDA was authorized to permit generic biologicals in a section of “Obamacare” (the Affordable Care Act), but final rules have not yet been promulgated. Since Neupogen is not “under patent” or NCE exclusivity in the U.S. this can roughly be analogized to a Para. III ANDA filing. With many other applications in progress, we will have to see how rough this gets.

Read more here.

Biotech’s PR Problems Continue

Friday, February 15th, 2013

Maybe “Fish gotta swim” but the FDA has extended the approval period for transgenic Salmon genetically engineered to reach market weight sooner. No evidence at all has been presented that filets from these fish would present a danger human consumers – and may well provide a benefit to an increasingly hungry world.

This report once again reminded me how far scientific advances in biotech have exceeded the industry’s attempts to explain their benefits to the consuming public. As biotech companies wisely sold the advantages of herbicide resistant corn, cotton and soybeans to farmers well prior to their “launch”. Farmers were tired of using herbicides that could kill their human handlers. By the time the Supreme Court decided that plants were patentable (in 2002), about 65% of U.S. corn was transgenic (and patented as well). However, the EU countries don’t grow much corn, and the lack of lobbying there contributed to the general ban on imports of genetically engineered crops and sandwich shops that advertise that their snacks have no GMO’s.

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Edwards Lifesciences v. Corevalve – Pig Valve Implants Enabling

Monday, November 19th, 2012

In Edwards Lifesciences AB v. Corevalve, Inc. (now a part of Medtronic), Appeal No. 2011-1215-1257 (Fed. Cir. Nov. 13, 2012), Corevalve challenged the validity of US Pat. No. 5,411,552 directed to a “transcather heart valve” on the basis that the valve had only been implanted in pigs as of the effective filing date of the patent, and that not all of the experimental implants were successful. The Fed. Cir. disagreed, and Edwards provides a succinct review of the standards for enablement based on animal testing.

The panel began by reminding the parties that “[t]he enablement requirement is met if the description [in the specification] enables any mode of making and using the invention.” Johns Hopkins Univ. v. CellPro, Inc. 152 F.3d 1342, 1361 (Fed. Cir. 1998). In other contexts, this statement permits claims based on “benchtop” syntheses, even if the claimed compound or process is being produced or practiced on a pilot plant scale. “The most efficient commercial embodiment need not be disclosed. Durel Corp. v. Osram Sylvania, Inc., 256 F.3d 1298 (Fed. Cir. 2001).”

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Legal Challenge To “ObamaCare” Threatens Generic Biologicals

Thursday, March 29th, 2012

What should not be lost on pharma/biotech patent attorneys or their clients, amidst all the attention given to the Supreme Court’s review of the “Patient Protection and Affordable Health Care Act” – public law 111-48, is that it contains the entirety of the legal and regulatory approval process for “biosimilars” or generic biological products. As I wrote here on March 26, 2010, Title IV of the law is “Improving Access to Innovative Medicial Therapies” – Subtitle A and is referred to as the “Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act of 2009.” It can be most easily be followed by printing (roughly) pages 1827-1869 of the PDF of H.R. 3590. The Act amends section 351 of 42 USC 262 and 35 USC 271(e). In my March 26th post I reviewed many of its Hatch-Waxman-like features.

Since enactment, there have been many seminars, workshops and symposia about how best to implement these procedures at the FDA/USPTO, and the FDA has finally begun to work with the stakeholders to provide a regulatory pathway for generic biologicals. Without such a pathway –as currently – a generic biological has to endure the same NDA route to approval as any other new drug. Questions of what degree of “biosimilarity” should be required and what the market exclusivity period should be for the first generic biological to be approved have been hotly debated.

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