Posts Tagged ‘patents’

Patent Office Publishes Subject Matter “Update”

Thursday, July 30th, 2015

updateToday (July 30th), the Patent Office released an 11 page “July 2015 Update” on patent-eligible subject matter (or not). (A copy of the update and appendices can be found at the end of this post.) Most of the “Update” focused on clarifying the December 2014 revised guidance. Also released were new examples 21-26–including ones modeled on Flook and Diehr. None of the new examples related to the life-sciences. Also released were an Appendix 2 that indexed all of the examples released since December 2014, and an Appendix 3, summarizing all of the case law discussed.

So if you are a life sciences person, you need only peruse the “Update.” It spends considerable space discussing how to apply the December 2014 Guidance, but the takeaway is that you need to rebut the natural product exception with a showing of markedly difference characteristics (2A) or else you fall into the dreaded “significantly more” circle of Hell called 2B. There is also some attempt to clarify the role of the “Streamlined Analysis” and preemption, that I don’t think clarified anything and that Examiners ignore anyway.

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Innovation Act Stalls in the House

Friday, July 17th, 2015

iStock_000001499158_SmallRepresentative Goodlatte’s Innovation Act (H.R. 9) has been shelved for now, and will not receive a floor vote until September at the earlier. There is significant conflict between measures intended to deter patent trolls and the ability of non-profit institutional NPE’s to enforce their patents. Big Pharma wants “out” of IPR entirely.  Action on the corresponding Senate Bill,  S. 1137, will also be postponed.

A 3-page chart comparing major provisions of the bill with IPO positions is available on the IPO website. 

In re Cuozzo – Still no changes for the claim interpretation standard during inter partes review proceedings

Monday, July 13th, 2015

iStock_000040556240_SmallA guest post from Theresa Stadheim, attorney at Schwegman Lundberg & Woessner.

In In re: Cuozzo Speed Technologies, LLC, Appeal No. 2014-1301 (Fed. Cir. July 8, 2015, decision by Dyk), the Federal Circuit decided not to review the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (the “Board”) practice of construing patents under the broadest reasonable interpretation (BRI) standard.

Garmin petitioned the Board for inter partes review (IPR) of claims 10, 14 and 17 of Cuozzo’s U.S. Patent No. 6,778,074 (the ‘074 patent). Garmin contended that claim 10 was invalid as anticipated under 35 U.S.C. § 102(e) or as obvious under 35 U.S.C. § 103(a) and that claims 14 and 17 were obvious under § 103(a). Claim 10 recited:

A speed limit indicator comprising:
a global positioning system receiver;
a display controller connected to said global positioning system receiver, wherein said display controller adjusts a colored display in response to signals from said global positioning system receiver to continuously update the delineation of which speed readings are in violation of the speed limit at a vehicle’s present location; and
a speedometer integrally attached to said colored display.

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“If Wishes Were Horses” – Roberts’ Dissent from Myriad

Monday, June 29th, 2015

horses2After reading Obergefell v. Hodges, 576 U.S.___(2015), (a copy is found at the end of this post) I was struck by Justice Robert’s dissent – which excoriates the majority for legislating from the bench and basing its opinion on “social policy.”

In AMP v. Myriad, Justice Roberts joined in a unanimous opinion holding that segments of DNA are patent-ineligible “natural products,” reversing a Fed. Cir. panel decision that held DNA to be patent-eligible as a novel chemical molecule.

But what if Justice Roberts disagreed with his brethren and penned a dissent? I have repeatedly taken the position that Myriad was decided on policy grounds, which required the Justices to decide that a novel chemical compound is not a “composition of matter” under s. 101, but is something else.

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