Posts Tagged ‘USPTO’

Patent Office Publishes Subject Matter “Update”

Thursday, July 30th, 2015

updateToday (July 30th), the Patent Office released an 11 page “July 2015 Update” on patent-eligible subject matter (or not). (A copy of the update and appendices can be found at the end of this post.) Most of the “Update” focused on clarifying the December 2014 revised guidance. Also released were new examples 21-26–including ones modeled on Flook and Diehr. None of the new examples related to the life-sciences. Also released were an Appendix 2 that indexed all of the examples released since December 2014, and an Appendix 3, summarizing all of the case law discussed.

So if you are a life sciences person, you need only peruse the “Update.” It spends considerable space discussing how to apply the December 2014 Guidance, but the takeaway is that you need to rebut the natural product exception with a showing of markedly difference characteristics (2A) or else you fall into the dreaded “significantly more” circle of Hell called 2B. There is also some attempt to clarify the role of the “Streamlined Analysis” and preemption, that I don’t think clarified anything and that Examiners ignore anyway.

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“If Wishes Were Horses” – Roberts’ Dissent from Myriad

Monday, June 29th, 2015

horses2After reading Obergefell v. Hodges, 576 U.S.___(2015), (a copy is found at the end of this post) I was struck by Justice Robert’s dissent – which excoriates the majority for legislating from the bench and basing its opinion on “social policy.”

In AMP v. Myriad, Justice Roberts joined in a unanimous opinion holding that segments of DNA are patent-ineligible “natural products,” reversing a Fed. Cir. panel decision that held DNA to be patent-eligible as a novel chemical molecule.

But what if Justice Roberts disagreed with his brethren and penned a dissent? I have repeatedly taken the position that Myriad was decided on policy grounds, which required the Justices to decide that a novel chemical compound is not a “composition of matter” under s. 101, but is something else.

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Apotex Petitions Supreme Court to Review Therasense Standards

Thursday, May 21st, 2015

Magnesium SaltIn Apotex, Inc. v. UCB, Inc., Appeal No. 2013-1674 (Fed. Cir. August 15, 2014) the court affirmed the district court’s ruling that one actor, Dr. Sherman, the chairman of Apotex had committed inequitable conduct by engaging in what the court found was a perfect storm of misrepresentations during the prosecution of U.S. Pat. No. 6,767,566 that claimed a method to make the magnesium (Mg) salt of Moexipril. The Fed. Cir. found that Dr. Sherman, the named inventor on the application withheld prior art, mischaracterized the cited art in arguments and via a Rule 132 Declaration, and included examples in the application that had not been performed. In fact, this was characterized as an attempt to patent a competitor’s drug.  The  competitor, UCB, had listed in the Orange Book, as the hydrochloride salt – although the court found that Dr. Sherman was aware that the process disclosed in the listed patent, U.S Patent No. 4,743,450, would yield the Mg salt of Moexipril, which imparted substantial stability. The Fed. Cir. agreed with Apotex that Dr. Sherman had no duty to disclose his own suspicions or beliefs regarding the prior art (that he suspected that the ‘450 process would in fact yield the stable Mg salt) but rested its holding on its opinion that Dr. Sherman “affirmatively and knowingly misrepresented material facts regarding the prior art.” Slip op. at 15.

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U.S. Patent Commissioner Focarino To Retire

Friday, May 1st, 2015

From IPO Daily News, Friday, May 1, 2015

Peggy Focarino_smallThis week U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s Commissioner of Patents Margaret (Peggy) Focarino announced that she will retire on July 3 as U.S. Patent and Trademark Commissioner. Focarino has been with the USPTO for 38 years. Executive Director Herb Wamsley said “Focarino has consistently earned high marks for her management skills and her strong interest in working closely with user groups. We wish her well in retirement.” Focarino’s successor has not been named.

She was appointed Commissioner of Patents in January 2012; she was the first female to serve in that role. As Commissioner, Focarino is responsible for management and direction of all aspects of patent operations, examination policy, resources and planning, and budget administration. She previously served as Deputy Commissioner for Patents. Focarino also served as Acting Director and Deputy Director of the USPTO before Michelle Lee’s appointment in late 2013.