Posts Tagged ‘biotechnology law’

Enzo Biochem V. Applera Corp. – When “Words Can Hurt You”

Thursday, March 19th, 2015

iStock_000010676885_SmallOn March 16, 2015 (Appeal no. 2014-1321), the Fed. Cir. reversed the district court’s construction of a claim term relating to the scope of “A,” a moiety capable of direct or indirect signaling that is attached by a linker to a nucleotide base. (A copy of the decision can be found at the end of this post.) The claim read: “wherein A comprises at least one component of a signaling moiety capable of producing a detectable signal [wherein the linker does not interfere] with formation of the signaling moiety or detection of the detectable signal….”

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Takeaways from Chisum Patent Academy 2015 Seminar in Cincinnati

Wednesday, March 11th, 2015

Guest Post from Don Chisum

iStock_000017522821_SmallOn March 5-6, 2015 the Chisum Patent Academy held a two-day seminar at the 21C Museum Hotel in downtown Cincinnati, Ohio to discuss and debate current developments in U.S. patent law. The roundtable seminar group was limited to ten persons; sessions were led by treatise authors and educators Donald Chisum and Janice Mueller.

Attendees included experienced patent litigators and prosecutors from law firms and corporations in Detroit, Chicago, Phoenix, Cincinnati, Cleveland, St. Louis, and the Washington, DC area. Participants enjoyed the 21C’s Museum Hotel’s provocative modern art collection, innovative food and accommodations, and lively seminar discussion.

Here’s our recap of the takeaways from the seminar:

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Universities Response to Patent “Reform” Legislation

Friday, February 27th, 2015

iStock_000015456314_Small copyOn February 24th, a letter sent by the Association of American Universities, signed by 145 universities, to Senators Grassley and Leahy and Representatives Goodlatte and Conyers, objected to parts of legislation such as “The Innovation Act, H.R. 9” that purports to deter litigation by non-practicing entities, such as patent “trolls.” The Universities emphasized the damage that fee-shifting provisions requiring the loser of an infringement suit to pay the winner’s costs and fees would do to educational and research institutions that already find it financially difficult to enforce their IP rights. The letter pointed out the chilling effect such provisions would have on attempts to license technology, especially to start-ups. Also noted was the fact that mandatory joinder provisions could draw a university and its inventors into litigation initiated by third parties over which the university has little control.

“Precision Medicine” Initiative Leaves Patents “Lost in Space”

Wednesday, February 18th, 2015

iStock_000009217209_SmallOn January 30th, the White House released a press release expanding upon President Obama’s mention of “precision medicine” in his State of the Union Address. Not surprisingly, the details are pretty much what we who are involved in various aspects of “personalized medicine” would expect – an emphasis on the use of genomic diagnostics to improve treatment selection – especially for cancer patients. The largest of the “Key Investments” listed would be to the NIH to develop what looks like the creation of a reference data base “through engaged participants and open, responsible data sharing.” The NCI would get $70 million to “identify genomic drivers in cancer” and develop more effective approaches to treatment.

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